There are over 40 life losses that can result in the symptoms of grief, including a loss of feeling safe, which might apply to staff returning to work. 
 
If you’re a business owner, manager, or HR professional, you may find some staff are reluctant to return to the office after working from home. 
 
When employers understand and acknowledge the impact grief can have on their teams, employee mood, satisfaction, productivity and retention improve. 
As a new academic year begins, you may find many children need extra support and encouragement as they try to recover from two academic years full of disruption and uncertainty. 
 
If you work with children in an educational setting, you know it’s not realistic to protect children from everything sad or frightening in life, and that with the right tools to deal with emotional pain and grief, children can be very resilient. 
 
We welcome a recent Sky News article highlighting the need for teachers to receive training for supporting studentswho have lost loved ones. 
Listening to someone who is heartbroken can feel uncomfortable.  
 
We’re used to people being happy and positive but when it comes to sadness, it can feel awkward and our ‘go to’ place is to try and make them feel better as quickly as possible.  
 
Fear of how to approach grievers and assist them stops many well-meaning people from being there for these people when they are most needed. 
In the 1990s, a book was released called 'Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus', which explored the differences of behaviour in men and women.  
 
From our work, it seems the same is apparent when men and women grieve. Men seem to hold onto or hide their emotions, whereas women are more open in expressing their feelings. 
 
We’ve noticed men often don't get as much support from friends, family, and society in general. 
This is a hard blog to write – I’ve known I needed to write this for ages and normally when I sit with something the words start to come together in my head but interestingly my thoughts about this man who used few words seems to be well, coming up with few words! 
 
It was 2007, not that many months after my husband Kevin had died aged just 41 and life as I knew it ended forever, when I found myself on Amazon (other booksellers are available.) I was looking for a book that would help me deal with the overwhelming feelings that were dominating my life. One review said “well this book is ok but... 
Carole was a guest of Tara Nash, creator of the Conscious Grief series. 
 
In the video, Carole talks about how the Grief Recovery Method helped her and others move forwards to find joy again after significant emotional loss. 
 
You can use the time stamps below to move to any of the questions Carole addressed.  
Once again, the academic year has dished out lots of losses for teachers, students and parents alike. 
 
Loss of normal 
Loss of routine 
Perhaps even loss of loved ones or colleagues  
 
As parents, you might also be feeling a loss of hopes and expectations for your children. 
 
If you're a teacher, you may feel a lack of support from Ofqual and the government, and maybe your school, and you may feel a loss of safety due to constant exposure to others. 
Are you prepared for returning to your workplace after loss during the pandemic? 
 
If you’ve lost a relative during Lockdown and you’re experiencing grief, it would be useful to mention this to your employer before you head back to work.  
 
This will help your employer to prepare for your return and help them to understand that you may need additional support and understanding. 
When people say, ‘You have to let go and move on,’ at the end of a relationship, not many people give you the steps to take you forward.  
 
Before you know it, you might have drifted into your next relationship without dealing with the emotional fall-out of the last one, without making room in your heart for the person who could become the love of your life. 
 
Most of us understand what is meant when the word ‘baggage’ is used in the context of a failed relationship. 
Eating too much during lockdown
A question we often get asked is “should I take my young child to a funeral?” At Grief Recovery, we believe that all feelings are normal and natural including sad or painful ones so it would be easy to say “yes of course”. The real question is whether your child is old enough to hang around relatively quietly while the adults do what they must do. If they can do that then yes, they should go. 
 
Crucially, before that happens, the child needs to know what to expect and what your expectations are of them so you’ll need to do some explaining before the event: 
Should I let my child go to a funeral?
The pain of losing a child cannot be described in words. It doesn’t matter if the child is still young, an adult, or still in the womb – a child is a part of us and the pain of losing that extraordinary person is incomprehensibly heartbreaking. The loss of a child creates a ripple effect that can touch the lives of relatives, friends, and the larger community. 
 
There are plenty of heartfelt stories, blogs, books and groups dedicated to people who have been bereaved by the loss of a child. In this article we are turning our focus to common misconceptions around child loss so that we can bring comfort and hope to those who are grieving. 
Loss of a child
Every loss is unique, as is every person who has suffered loss. But those who have been bereaved by suicide know that there are aspects of this type of loss that are particularly painful, hard to accept, challenging to explain to others and seemingly impossible to overcome. 
 
We would like to talk about some of the unique aspects of bereavement by suicide to help those left behind as well as those who would like to provide them support. 
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