For nearly 40 years the Grief Recovery Method has helped people all over the world move beyond bereavement, divorce and other losses. As a result of the work of over 10,000 Grief Recovery Specialists our programmes have received many thousands of thank you notes, reviews, testimonials and feedback surveys speaking of the huge difference this structured, heart-led approach has made. 
 
In Spring 2019 we reached a new milestone when the peer reviewed "American Journal of Health Education" (Volume 50 issue 2 to be precise" published research carried out by Dr Nolan and Dr Hallam of Kent University Ohio confirmed that the Grief Recovery Method made a measurable postivie impact on the grief journey of the participant. 
Evidence base Grief Recovery
For those who are having a hard time this Father’s Day, just remember: 
 
It’s okay to be sad. 
 
You don’t need to be strong for anyone else. 
 
All feelings are normal. 
 
You don’t need to grieve alone. 
 
You're entitled to feelings of sadness even if your father is still alive or you have children of your own. 
Father's Day for grievers
It doesn't matter if it's to a new home, a new school, or to a different country - all of us will have moved at some point in our lives. 
 
Many moves happen during childhood, when young families expand and build homes, experience a job transfer, or find a better suited school for their children. Well-meaning parents, anticipating that the move may be difficult, scary or painful for their child, try to ward off any negative feelings by making positive, hopeful statements. 
Moving can cause grief - how to help your child cope
Grief Recovery Method
For those of us who have participated in a Grief Recovery Method programme and have seen the results first hand, there is no doubt that its action steps are effective. 
 
Now, however, there is scientific research to support its effectiveness with grievers. 
 
In the first known university study to examine different approaches available to those who are suffering from a loss, the Grief Recovery Method has been shown to make a true & measurable difference. 
To say that people are uncomfortable with emotions such as sadness, rage or fear – especially after a personal loss – is an understatement. 
 
Sit back for a moment and think about the times in your life when you were feeling sad and tried to talk about those feelings with others. On a few occasions your friend or family member may have simply listened without analysis, criticism or judgement. More often than not, however, you may have received one of the following responses:- 
How to Listen to a Griever
Losing a pet can be one of the most heart-breaking experiences in a person’s life. The bond between a human being and an animal can be deeper and more loving than some could ever imagine. Often a pet is the most trusted companion in a person’s life, providing unconditional love and loyalty in even the most difficult of circumstances. 
 
When a pet dies or runs away, an owner may lose someone who has always been by their side. The loss can significantly affect their ability to concentrate and function, just like a loss of any other kind. 
Coping with the loss of a pet
I remember vividly within days of my husband Kevin dying being asked about his stuff. Honestly! You would imagine that there would be a whole host of other topics people would ask about before this, but no. Everyone wanted to know "have you done anything about the clothes yet?" 
 
If you are reading this and grieving yourself I bet you will have immediately noticed that these possessions which sat next to his skin have been de-personalised. THE clothes, not his clothes. "The Clothes", as if they are wild animals which left untamed & uncaptured will riot around the house (i.e. your life) out of control. 
What to do with the clothes when someone dies
Whether you always made a big deal of Father’s Day or it barely raised a mention in your household there is no doubt that this year it will feel like it’s everywhere and unrelenting. 
 
Continual reminders of the life you no longer have, rubbing salt into your wounded heart. 
 
Unfortunately, however much you want to put your head under the duvet and not come out until Tuesday you can’t. You have to continue to be both parents to your kids who also are being bombarded with images of kids playing or bonding with their Dad’s. So what can you do to get through this as best you can? 
Widows Guide to Surviving Fathers Day
Age is not a factor here, as in it doesn't matter how old you are. 
 
If your Dad has died Father’s Day sucks. Yes I know that is an American phrase but it’s one that I think says it all really succinctly without swearing. 
 
If you are a Dad whose child has died Father’s Day sucks. 
 
If you are a Dad whose child has run away or gone missing Father’s Day sucks. 
 
If you are a Mum whose husband has died Father’s Day sucks. 
Father's Day when you're grieving sucks
One of the most common questions we get asked is "What is the difference between what you do and Cruse?" 
 
There are lots of points of difference, so I'll explain the key ways that the Grief Recovery Method and Certified Grief Recovery Specialists are different to Cruse and Cruse Bereavement Support Workers. 
Grief Recovery vs Cruse Bereavement Care
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